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Volume 15 » Issue 2 »
News pages

News pages

Utilities at 'tipping point'; Heatwave the most lethal disaster of 2019; Cyberattacks on healthcare; The need to treat humans, animals, the economy and the planet as one; Maternity hospital attack; New CRJ Advisory Panel Members

Time for experts to stand up and make themselves heard

Time for experts to stand up and make themselves heard

Why do the warnings and advice of emergency experts go unheeded with such depressing regularity? It is a matter of earning back public trust, says Dr Eric Russell. They must come out of their silos and speak directly to the public. They need to earn the confidence of the people. When they don’t know something, they should be open about it

Disaster management meets King of the Monsters

Disaster management meets King of the Monsters

The 2016 film, 'Shin Godzilla', is is widely acknowledged as a metaphorical embodiment of contemporary and institutional disaster management in the face of large-scale catastrophe. Whether a crisis takes the form of a microscopic or gargantuan threat, the universal fundamentals remain the same

Climate change in the time of coronavirus

Climate change in the time of coronavirus

Alice C Hill and William Kakenmaster warn that although the current pandemic has seen the largest annual decrease in carbon emissions in recorded history, we cannot divert focus from the crucial efforts needed to reduce emissions permanently. We must prepare for – and adapt to – the effects of climate change

Emergency management and Covid-19

Emergency management and Covid-19

“Not having experienced a major outbreak in history is no excuse for poor crisis response,” says John Drake, who predicted that Covid-19 would spawn other crises, including economic contractions and social discord, not to mention a toxic mental health legacy, when he wrote his article in March 2020 for this June edition

Covid-19: the case for a timely, independent lessons learnt inquiry

Covid-19: the case for a timely, independent lessons learnt inquiry

This article argues for an independent inquiry as soon as a reasonable distance can be achieved from current events, but not for a deferral of more than six or so months, and outlines the key areas that should be focused upon

Is there really a ‘new normal’?

Is there really a ‘new normal’?

What will normality look like? Are our global post-WWII agencies, created with a mid-century mindset, fit for purpose today? Here are some anticipated trends: Geopolitical rivalries coming to the fore; trade protectionism; re-evaluation of supply chains and national production; the European Union; taxation; and the issues of freedom, personal privacy and data ownership

No one is coming

No one is coming

Long after the Covid-19 crisis becomes more manageable and the media turns its attention to a new topic, emergency managers will still be working in communities to pick up the pieces. Sherry-Lea Bloodworth Botop says this is nothing new. Those who work in this field find themselves rebuilding the recovery process over and over again, without the necessary support

Supply chain surge capacity

Supply chain surge capacity

The world economy has become increasingly interdependent for a long time, and the process of globalisation has accelerated in recent decades. Closely coupled with globalisation, both private and public entities have continuously been driven to do more with less. Surge capacity has traditionally relied on regional or national mutual aid systems. What happens when everywhere is affected at the same time?

Lockdown exit strategies: Supply chain dimensions

Lockdown exit strategies: Supply chain dimensions

In an assessment of several countries’ lockdown strategies, Paché says that supply chain mapping and the formulation of rigorous recovery plans, combined with companies’ willingness to invest the time, resources and effort into these steps will help to negate the disadvantageous consequences of an uncertain tomorrow

Science on the front line

Science on the front line

The Covid-19 pandemic has once again laid bare the need for independent, well-funded science and research, says Paolo Garonna. It is even more vital that governments do not interfere; rather than undermining and marginalising scientific research, they should support it in a true multilateral and global effort, without seeking to harness it for their own political expedience

A better normal: Building equity in crises

A better normal: Building equity in crises

Covid-19 continues to affect people of colour, those experiencing poverty and medically fragile people disproportionately. This unequal impact is nothing new. Instead of looking for a new normal beyond the pandemic, we should choose to change the state of inequity entirely and look for a ‘better normal’

The psychosocial burdens of Covid-19

The psychosocial burdens of Covid-19

Given the magnitude of the Covid-19 crisis, virtually everyone across the globe will experience varying degrees of psychosocial burden, and for many, this will be long-lasting and detrimental, particularly among healthcare workers

Overcoming the mental health challenges of Covid-19

Overcoming the mental health challenges of Covid-19

Aside from the loss of loved ones, daily deaths and the toll of working in dangerous occupations on the front line of this healthcare crisis, distancing and isolation are also deleterious to our wellbeing. What can we all do to keep ourselves healthy, both physically and mentally?

Lockdown: Drawing from hostages' experiences

Lockdown: Drawing from hostages' experiences

People are enduring extreme social distancing and isolation as governments and health services tackle the Covid-19 crisis. How can we apply lessons from ‘conduct after capture’ techniques for those who have been held hostage to this context?

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